Maundy Thursday

Strange public spiritual practices and stripping in church! I love Maundy Thursday. But there are quote a lot of citations from these texts in The Book of Concord.

Exodus 12:1-4[5-10]11-14

Verse 11 is cited in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 23: The Marriage of Priests (AP 23.26, n. 475) in a footnote that tells us this verse was cited in the Confutation arguing for celibate priests. Melanchthon rails against this double speak of marriage as both a sacrament, but also something to be avoided as "impure and sinful" (AP 23.26).

Psalm 116:1-2, 12-19

Verse 17 is quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 24: The Mass (AP 24.29) in a section where Melanchthon is delving into the scriptural understanding of worship. This paragraph focuses on the psalms, and this verse is lifted up to show that prayer is a sacrifice of thanksgiving.

1 Corinthians 11:23-26

Verse 23, and really the rest of chapter 11, are cited and quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 22: Concerning Both Kinds in the Lord's Supper (AP 22.3) to show that Paul received the tradition of receiving both the bread and the wine in communion, and this is what Paul passed on--not withholding the cup as was common at the time of the Reformation.

Verses 23-33 are cited in the German text of The Augsburg Confession, Article 24: The Mass (AC 24.39) to show that communion is not celebrated for the dead, or for others, but for those present. The Latin text just cites verse 11 as an editorial insert.

Verses 23-25 are cited in several footnotes. First, in The Small Catechism, The Sacrament of the Altar (SC Altar.4, n. 99), citing the texts of the words of institution and how what is used here is a conflation. Second, in The Large Catechism, Preface, Concerning the Sacrament (LC Preface.23, n. 31) this passage is quoted and the footnote clarifies that the quote is Luther's translation. Third, in The Large Catechism, Fifth Part: The Sacrament of the Altar (LC 5.3, n. 226), again citing the biblical references for the words of institution and that this quote is a conflation.

Verse 24 is quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 24: The Mass (AP 24.71) quoting Jesus and the first spiritual impulse of Christian worship: "being put to death and being made alive" (AP 24.71) because "to remember Christ's benefits and to receive them by faith so that we are made alive through them" (AP 24.72).

Verse 24 is quoted, along with all the synoptic parallels, in Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration, Article 7: Holy Supper (SD 7.35) in an argument against transubstantiation.

Verse 25 comes up in a footnote in The Augsburg Confession, Article 24: Mass (AC 24.30, n. 152) to cite that Jesus commands us to celebrate communion in order to remember him, so that we can remember the benefits God gives us through Jesus by faith for encouragement and consolation.

Verse 25 is cited in an editorial insert in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 13: The Number and Use of the Sacraments (AP 13.22) as a reminder that communion is a sacrament of the New Testament because that is what Jesus says, so what is received in communion is all the promises of the New Testament.

Verse 25 is also cited in Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration, Article 7: Holy Supper (SD 7.52) along with the list of synoptic parallels to argue against communion as merely a memorial meal.

Verse 26 is quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 4: Justification (AP 4.210) as Melanchthon lays the groundwork for the argument between the Lutheran and Roman understanding of communion--that communion offers us confession of faith in public and be strengthened in our faith rather than communion as a work that removes guilt.

Verse 26 comes up again in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 24: The Mass (AP 24.35) as a quote showing that it is good that communion be celebrated daily, but that it not be removed from the rest of the worship service, thus presenting communion as a work that functions by itself.

John 13:1-17, 31b-35

Verse 3 is cited twice in Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration, Article 8: Person of Christ. The first citation (SD 8.55) is a passing reference with many others showing that Jesus' divine majesty are characteristics of who Jesus is, not gifts given to a human by God. The second citation (SD 8.70) is a quote among a series of quotes cited to show the two natures of Jesus are not imparted from one to another, but are united in Jesus.

TheoThru

Too... many... citations... But, a helpful reminder that our worship practices grow out of our faith rather than being applied as a work to cover our sin.

  •  What practices do we act as if they work ex opere operato?
  • How do we invite people into worship practices so that they are experienced as an outgrowth of faith?
  • How do we settle ourselves when other people's faith does not lead them to some of our worship practices?