Lectionary 19 C

Seriously, every reading has at least one citation. Every reading. Even both the semicontinuous readings. Another instance of a Lutheran applying some influence on the Revised Common Lectionary selections? Or maybe just a Phillipist, given all the citations from the Apology.

Genesis 15:1-6

Verse 1 is quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 4: Justification (AP 4.58, second quarto edition) as an example of someone, Abraham in this case, hearing and believing God's promise.

Verse 6 is cited in Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration, Article 3: Righteousness (SD 3.33), along with Hebrews 11:8 below, to show that God declares Abraham righteous both before Abraham does any good works and also after, emphasizing that the good works did not change God's judgment.

Verse 6 is also cited in a footnote a bit later in the same article (SD 3.41, n. 119) indicating where Luther's summary of this verse and story might be found.

Isaiah 1:1, 10-20 (Semicontinuous)

Verses 16-19 are partly quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 12: Repentance (AP 12.164) to show that repentance positively effects both our public and private lives.

Verses 19-20 are cited with several other passages in a footnote to Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 18: Free Will (AP 18.1, n. 415) that come from the Confutation, and that Melanchthon notes "are not at all applicable to this matter [of free will]" (AP 18.1). Ha!

Psalm 33:12-22

Verse 18 is quoted in a quote from a sermon from Bernard of Clairvaux in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 12: Repentance (AP 12.58 octavo, Bernard's Sermon on the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary) to show Bernard connecting contrition and faith through this psalm verse. This Psalm pericope is also used for the Vigil of Pentecost.

Psalm 50:1-8, 22-23 (Semicontinuous)

Verse 8 is quoted in Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 4: Justification (AP 4.207) as one of the prophets' rebukes against an x opere operato understanding of religious rituals, assuming that they give us some control over God.

Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-16

Verse 1 is cited in The Augsburg Confession, Article 20: Faith (AC 20.25, German text only) as evidence that faith is not simply knowledge, but trust in God to keep promises.

Verse 8 is cited in Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration, Article 3: Righteousness (SD 3.33) with Genesis 15:6 above, to show that God declares Abraham righteous both before Abraham does any good works and also after, emphasizing that the good works did not change God's judgment.

Luke 12: 32-40

Verse 33 is cited in a footnote to The Large Catechism, Part 1: The Ten Commandments, The Seventh Commandment (LC 1.242, n. 106) as a reference along with Matthew 6:19-20 for one of Luther's biblically inspired curses: "Yes, where you have cheated and defrauded anyone out of a gulden, your entire hoard ought to be consumed by rust so that you will never enjoy it" (LC 1.242).

TheoThru

At least one connection between the texts is directly made for us in the Formula, but the connection here seems direct: faith is trusting that God will keep the promises God has made. The challenge still present is to not think that our work, be it our doing good works, our participation in rituals, or even our trusting God, give us some kind of power or authority over God's judgment.

  • How do we lead worship so that people don't think of it as magic?
  • How is God calling us as preachers to more deeply trust God's promises?